Platform A
       
     
Jack Mackerel
       
     
Sheephead and Divers, Looking Up
       
     
Emily Callahan, R2R Co-Founder and Explorer
       
     
Garibaldi
       
     
Bait Ball
       
     
Cold Water Sponges
       
     
A baby sea lion investigates what our explorers are doing on her rig
       
     
Female Sheephead
       
     
Anemones, mussels and brittle stars are illuminated on the Platform's beam
       
     
Juvenile Garibaldi
       
     
Jack Mackerel Bait Ball
       
     
Divers hover at a Maximum depth of 90 feet
       
     
A Brilliant Spanish Shawl Nudibranch is nearly Camoflaged Along a cross beam
       
     
Cascading Life on Oil Platform Euerka
       
     
Tree Fish
       
     
Divers Explore the Vast Platform
       
     
Oil Platform Elly and Ellen
       
     
Gina's legs decorated with invertebrates
       
     
Local sea lion sneaks a peak at a diver on platform Gina
       
     
Sheep Crab dines on invertebrates encrusted on Platform Gina
       
     
Strawberry Anemone
       
     
Curious sea lion investigates our cameras
       
     
Rigs to Reefs
       
     
Platform Gina
       
     
Blacksmith Fish Feast on the Plankton Rich Waters Surrounding the Platform
       
     
A sheep crab dances across a beam
       
     
Sea anemones cover Platform Gina's beam
       
     
UCSB diver, DJ, takes it all in
       
     
Colorful sponges make the original platform structure almost impossible to spot
       
     
A view  from 40ft below the surface
       
     
Visually documenting this rig with GoPro
       
     
image_3.jpg
       
     
Platform A
       
     
Platform A

Located 5.8 miles offshore, 188 feet deep and the source of the infamous 1969 Oil Spill in Santa Barbara

Jack Mackerel
       
     
Jack Mackerel

Jack Mackerel swarm around Platform Eureka's invertebrate-covered legs.  Photo by: Caine Delacy

Sheephead and Divers, Looking Up
       
     
Sheephead and Divers, Looking Up

Two female Sheephead find shelter on Platform Euerka's crossbeam. The pinkish hue of their scales gives away their femininity- did you know Sheephead spend half of their lives as female and the other half as male? When they transform into a male their coloration also changes, from an all pink body to a black head and tail. Photo by: Caine Delacy

Emily Callahan, R2R Co-Founder and Explorer
       
     
Emily Callahan, R2R Co-Founder and Explorer

Emily gives the OK after another successful dive documenting the vibrant life found below CA's offshore oil and gas platforms. 

Garibaldi
       
     
Garibaldi

Out of the shadows we see a Garibaldi, the California State Fish and also known to be extremely territorial. Here she fiercely guards her home on Platform Eureka. Photo by: Caine Delacy

Bait Ball
       
     
Bait Ball

A Jack Mackerel "bait ball" forms underneath the platform. This behavior is an instinctual defense mechanism, as a lone Mackerel is more likely to be eaten than a large group. Strength in numbers! Photo by: Caine Delacy

Cold Water Sponges
       
     
Cold Water Sponges

Sponges are master filters. They can filter an amount of water 100,000 times their size each day! That means a basketball-sized sponge could filter an entire residential pool in one day. Photo by: Joe Platko

A baby sea lion investigates what our explorers are doing on her rig
       
     
A baby sea lion investigates what our explorers are doing on her rig
Female Sheephead
       
     
Female Sheephead

Here we see a female Sheephead circling the encrusted beam of platform Eureka.

Anemones, mussels and brittle stars are illuminated on the Platform's beam
       
     
Anemones, mussels and brittle stars are illuminated on the Platform's beam

Over time the Platform structure becomes encrusted with algae, tunicates, hard and soft corals, anemones and sponges; providing the foundation and primary production for this unique micro-ecosystem. 

Juvenile Garibaldi
       
     
Juvenile Garibaldi

Here we spot California's state fish, the Garibaldi, finding a nursery-like shelter on platform Ellen. He is covered in blue spots which indicate that he is a juvenile, and not a fully grown, totally golden orange adult. 

Jack Mackerel Bait Ball
       
     
Jack Mackerel Bait Ball

Jack Mackerel bait ball on the legs of Platform Eureka. Bait Balls like this one occur when small fish swarm in a tightly packed spherical formation about a common center. Bait fish like these perform this behavior when they are threatened by predators. Photo by: Caine Delacy

Divers hover at a Maximum depth of 90 feet
       
     
Divers hover at a Maximum depth of 90 feet

Both Platforms A and C drop to a depth of 188 feet, limiting divers to explore the rig from a safer depth of around 90 feet. 

A Brilliant Spanish Shawl Nudibranch is nearly Camoflaged Along a cross beam
       
     
A Brilliant Spanish Shawl Nudibranch is nearly Camoflaged Along a cross beam

Nudibranchs are picky eaters - individual species may eat only one kind of prey, and obtain their bright colors from the food they eat. These colors may be used for camouflage or to warn predators of the poison that lies within.

Cascading Life on Oil Platform Euerka
       
     
Cascading Life on Oil Platform Euerka

Swarms of small fish feed on plankton that upwell around oil platforms. The unique vertical structure of an oil platform provides a great delivery rate of this primary food source.

Tree Fish
       
     
Tree Fish

A Tree fish rests among the choas on oil platform Euerka.

Divers Explore the Vast Platform
       
     
Divers Explore the Vast Platform

One diver reflects, that diving on these platforms is like "being suspended upon the skeletal remains of the Empire State Building, floating effortlessly from one anemone encrusted cross beam to the next."

Oil Platform Elly and Ellen
       
     
Oil Platform Elly and Ellen

Platforms Ellen and Elly are unique because they are a double platform, connected by an above-water bridge. Platform Ellen is a drilling platform while Platform Elly houses equipment for separating the oil, natural gas and produced water.

Gina's legs decorated with invertebrates
       
     
Gina's legs decorated with invertebrates

Platform Gina's 90ft long legs serve as a home for algae and invertebrates such as barnacles, corals, and oysters to attach; the accumulation of attached marine life in turn provides intricate structure and food for assemblages of fish.

Local sea lion sneaks a peak at a diver on platform Gina
       
     
Local sea lion sneaks a peak at a diver on platform Gina

When the ocean current encounters a vertical structure, it can create a plankton-rich upwelling that provides a reliable feeding spot for small fish such as sardines and minnows, which draw in predators like sea lions.

Sheep Crab dines on invertebrates encrusted on Platform Gina
       
     
Sheep Crab dines on invertebrates encrusted on Platform Gina

Once anemones, algae, barnacles, and coral begin to attach themselves to Platform Gina, sheep crabs and other crustaceans arrive for a seat at the table.

Strawberry Anemone
       
     
Strawberry Anemone

The Strawberry Anemone reproduces using a method called "longitudinal division." Put simply, the animal will produce clones of itself that may cover the space of a coffee table. As a result, you find Strawberry Anemones in large clusters with all of the animals being descendants of one original anemone. 

Curious sea lion investigates our cameras
       
     
Curious sea lion investigates our cameras

Many sea lions are attracted to Platform Gina because it gives shelter from tidal currents and predators, and increases feeding potential.

Rigs to Reefs
       
     
Rigs to Reefs

Converting Rigs to Reefs provides a silver lining to the realities of offshore oil and gas development 

Platform Gina
       
     
Platform Gina

Found 4 miles offshore, in a blue ocean setting, this structure offers a marine refuge for sea lions, dolphins, anemones, crabs, but perhaps more importantly the endangered rockfish recognized as over-fished in the state of California.

Blacksmith Fish Feast on the Plankton Rich Waters Surrounding the Platform
       
     
Blacksmith Fish Feast on the Plankton Rich Waters Surrounding the Platform

Blacksmith school, sometimes in large numbers, typically swimming in open water well above the ocean bottom, feeding on plankton. During their resting hours from sunset to sunrise they gather in closely knit aggregations in caves, under ledges, and even in the crevices on offshore oil platforms.

A sheep crab dances across a beam
       
     
A sheep crab dances across a beam

To camouflage themselves, sheep crabs decorate their shells with barnacles, bryozoans, hydroids and algae.

Sea anemones cover Platform Gina's beam
       
     
Sea anemones cover Platform Gina's beam

Carnivorous and always hungry, sea anemones are not plants, but silent slow moving predators that will devour any small animal careless enough to stray within reach of their tentacles. 

UCSB diver, DJ, takes it all in
       
     
UCSB diver, DJ, takes it all in
Colorful sponges make the original platform structure almost impossible to spot
       
     
Colorful sponges make the original platform structure almost impossible to spot
A view  from 40ft below the surface
       
     
A view from 40ft below the surface

Platform Gina has life extending from the surface to the ocean floor, 95 ft down.

Visually documenting this rig with GoPro
       
     
Visually documenting this rig with GoPro
image_3.jpg